2018 California Fire Tracker

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by Dr. AMK, Nov 18, 2018.

  1. Fishon

    Fishon I Will Close You

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  2. JRE84

    JRE84 Notebook Deity

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    that looks exactly like me cept im younger
     
  3. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    PG&E Installs High-Def Camera Network to Monitor Marin Hills for Fire
    KPIX CBS SF Bay Area
    Published on Dec 25, 2018
    The utility blamed for almost a dozen California wildfires is giving a big gift to Marin County -- company has paid for a network of new fire-monitoring cameras to go up on the county’s peaks. Emily Turner reports. (12-25-18)
     
  4. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    PG&E Could Face Serious Criminal Charges In Wake Of Deadly Camp Fire
    KPIX CBS SF Bay Area
    Published on Dec 29, 2018
    California's top prosecutor is putting PG&E on notice. As Da Lin reports, the utility company could face manslaughter or murder charges for its role in the deadly Camp Fire.


    PG&E Could Face Serious Criminal Charges For Role In Deadly Camp Fire

    KPIX CBS SF Bay Area
    Published on Dec 29, 2018
    A brief from the Attorney General's office says PG&E could face serious criminal charges for its role in the deadly Camp Fire such as manslaughter or murder.


    AG: PG&E Could Face Murder Charges For Role In Deadly Camp Fire
    December 29, 2018 at 6:44 pm
    https://sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com/2018/12/29/pge-attorney-general-serious-charges-camp-fire/

    "SACRAMENTO (KPIX) – PG&E could face criminal charges as serious as manslaughter or murder in the wake of the deadly Camp Fire.

    The possible charges were described in a brief from the Office of the California Attorney General.

    If a jury finds PG&E guilty of criminal negligence or recklessness, the utility could face criminal charges that include:
    • Failing to clear vegetation from a power line or pole;
    • Starting a wildfire;
    • Involuntary manslaughter, or
    • Implied-malice murder.
    The last three are felonies. Deputy Attorney General Nicholas Fogg wrote:

    If PG&E caused any of the fires, the investigation would have to extend into PG&E’s operations, maintenance, and safety practices to determine whether criminal statutes were violated.”

    As for would happen if PG&E was convicted of murder, KPIX asked retired Judge LaDoris Cordell.

    “Even if it’s a murder conviction against the corporation, the corporation is not going to prison, nobody’s going to prison. so the courts are left with putting more probation on the corporation meaning we’ve got jurisdictions on you for maybe another 5 years,” said Cordell. “More fines, and maybe breaking up PG&E, that is within the jurisdiction, it could be, that says you can’t continue to operate like this because too many lives have been lost”

    The Camp Fire was the deadliest and most destructive wildfire in California’s history. It claimed 86 lives."
     
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2018
  5. Fishon

    Fishon I Will Close You

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    Profits are private while losses are picked up by the taxpaying public. Unfortunately, that's the way it goes far too often. It already happened once before in 2001 when they, PG&E, went bankrupt because of the Enron debacle. While, their stock has taken a hit, the state of Cali has already passed a bill to limit their liability, so we'll be paying for it in taxes and increased rates.

    https://www.reuters.com/article/us-...-bill-on-pge-wildfire-liability-idUSKCN1LH37B
     
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  6. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    And, Governor Brown signed bill SB901 on September 21st, here's some of the details:

    Governor Brown Signs SB 901, Addressing Wildfire Cost Recovery, But Ignoring Inverse Condemnation Liability
    by Nossaman LLP, September 24, 2018
    https://www.jdsupra.com/legalnews/governor-brown-signs-sb-901-addressing-12208/

    "On August 31, 2018, the California Legislature passed Senate Bill (“SB”) 901, which addresses a number of wildfire-related items relating to public utilities. Governor Brown signed the Bill into law on September 21, 2018.

    While the bill introduces a series of new changes, it is particularly noteworthy for what it does not include from Governor Brown’s initial June 2018 proposal for wildfire liability reform. At least for the time being, lawmakers abandoned the most controversial aspect of Governor Brown’s proposal for the bill: modifying California’s strict liability standard applied to utility companies for wildfires.

    SB 901 as passed by the Legislature does not make any changes to the state’s legal doctrine of inverse condemnation. However, SB 901 does makes several changes relevant to public and investor-owned utilities that are within jurisdiction of the California Public Utilities Commission (“CPUC”).

    Addresses cost recovery before the CPUC
    • New Reasonableness Standard for Recovery of Wildfire Costs – Authorizes the CPUC to use a more detailed reasonableness standard in determining whether an electrical utility will be allowed to recover through rates charged to consumers expenses related to damages stemming from a wildfire caused by the utility’s equipment. Specifically, SB 901 authorizes the CPUC to permit utilities to recover costs associated with wildfires occurring after December 31, 2018 and to consider 12 specified factors to determine whether the expenses are allowed or disallowed. The new reasonableness standard refines and puts a wildfire-specific nuance into the existing generalized CPUC-wide “prudent manager” standard, but only in the context of wildfire costs by electric corporations.
    • Rules for 2017 Wildfires – Specifies that for applications by an electrical corporation to recover costs and expenses arising from catastrophic wildfires ignited in 2017, the CPUC is required to continue to determine just and reasonableness without specifying the 12 enumerated factors identified for the fires in 2019 and beyond. In the case of the 2017 wildfires, the bill requires the CPUC to consider the electric utility’s financial status and determine the maximum amount the corporation can pay without harming ratepayers, also known as a “financial stress test,” and requires the CPUC to limit the disallowance from the 2017 wildfires to the threshold determined by the stress test.
    • Financing Via Rate Recovery Bonds – Allows (but does not require) the CPUC to authorize, under specified circumstances, the use of financing to reduce the bill shock associated with damages paid by utilities for wildfires for the amounts borne by ratepayers of the 2017 wildfires or of future fires. Upon a finding that certain wildfire damage costs are just and reasonable, the CPUC may authorize an electrical corporation to issue rate recovery bonds in order to finance such costs over a specified period of time. This financing provision is applicable only to electric corporations and does not cover the cost of fines and penalties.
    • Increased Penalties – Increases the amount of a penalty that the CPUC can assess for violations of CPUC orders, laws, and decisions from up to $50,000 to up to $100,000 per violation per day. Unlike the above provisions applicable only to electrical corporations, the increased penalties would be applicable to all types of utilities before the CPUC.
    Expands the requirements of the existing wildfire mitigation efforts of electric utilities
    • Wildfire Mitigation Plans – Requires wildfire mitigation plans of electric utilities to be approved within three months of its submission, unless the CPUC makes a written determination justifying the need to extend the deadline.
    • Collaboration with CalFire – Requires the CPUC to enter into a memorandum of understanding with CalFire to address several wildfire-related issues, such as: the development of consistent approaches and data sharing related to fire prevention, safety, vegetation management, and energy distribution systems.
    • Independent Evaluators – Requires the development of a list of approved independent evaluators with experience in assessing the safe operation of electrical infrastructure.
    SB 901 also makes comprehensive changes to forestry management and fuel reduction under the Forest Practice Act in order to mitigate the risk of wildfires across the state. These widespread changes were negotiated in weeks of conversation by Assembly and Senate staff, CalFire, the Governor’s Office, the Board, and many stakeholders.

    Lastly, SB 901 allocates $200 million per year for five years from the state’s Greenhouse Gas Reduction Fund in order to provide funding to CalFire for forest health and fire prevention and prescribed burns and other fuel reduction activities."

    California Legislature Bill SB901
    https://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/billTextClient.xhtml?bill_id=201720180SB901
     
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2018
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  7. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    California Attorney General: PG&E could face murder charges for wildfires
    CNN
    Published on Dec 30, 2018
    California's largest public utility provider could face murder or manslaughter charges if it were found responsible for causing the state's recent deadly wildfires, according to court documents filed by the state attorney general. Pacific Gas & Electric Co., or PG&E, could potentially face a range of criminal offenses if any of the wildfires broke out as a result of the utility failing to properly operate and maintain power lines, per an amicus brief filed in US District Court by California Attorney General Xavier Becerra.
     
  8. Fishon

    Fishon I Will Close You

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    Even if they were found guilty, no one would go to jail. The state will put them on a supervisory period like they did with the San Francisco gas leak, were they altered documents.

     
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  9. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Yeah, they've apparently been on double "not so" secret probation for a while, having blown it repeatedly - or "burned it" repeatedly...

    IDK why they aren't dealing with it with technical solutions, the costs to them need to be fines and "forced" implementation of technical solutions to mitigate the fire risks on a real time basis - implement some kind of monitoring / feedback control system, and jump out in front of this. The technical solutions could be valuable worldwide and could be a revenue source instead of a regulatory burden and cost to rate payers.

    PG&E has both a bad and a good reputation, and I know the workers are very proud of their efforts and do work on executing their work tasks in a respectable way for the community.

    That's why this is so frustrating... it should be so, there shouldn't be these constant tragedies.
     
  10. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    PG&E Ordered To Inspect All Territory For Trees, Equipment That Could Cause Wildfires
    KPIX CBS SF Bay Area
    Published on Jan 9, 2019
    A federal judge in San Francisco on Wednesday tentatively ordered PG&E to inspect its entire electrical service area and remove or trim any trees and repair any damaged transmission equipment that could cause wildfires. Veronica De La Cruz reports. (1-9-2019)
     
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