2013 Ativ Book 9 Plus owner's lounge (NP940X3G)

Discussion in 'Samsung' started by paulreedsmith, Sep 25, 2013.

  1. Yorgaki

    Yorgaki Newbie

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    Thanks John - I was thinking I might carefully take it apart and "jiggle things" a bit. This is really helpful info - appreciate it.
     
  2. lovelaptops

    lovelaptops MY FRIENDS CALL ME JEFF!

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    Hi,

    Long time member and owner of AB9+ (and many more since - sig way out of date!) but I need to call on the awesome expertise I notice this forum continues to have moderating.

    So, I haven't used this computer very much for the past year or so as it became a location-based machine in a client's office (for my sole use). Performance had been great from day one. John R may recall that around p. 150 of this thread I was obsessed with battery capacity when new showing 94% and then jumping around. That resolved itself after a couple of bios calibrations and regular use and for 4 years the battery has reported that it is at over a little over 100% of design capacity and battery life was great - 6-8 hrs, like clockwork. Until 9/1/17, that is! I've attached my Windows Battery Report and the items of note are that as of 6/14/17 the capacity showed as 55,460 mwh, basically 100% of design. I left it plugged in but my client office locked for the summer and picked it up on 9/1/17 and the capacity was down to 46,735. A little surprising because it maintained full design capacity for 3.5 yrs and after 2.5 months of non-use, plugged in (as had occurred many times over the previous 3.5 yrs) it dropped by around 20%, but it didn't bother much since 80% after nearly 4 yrs is pretty good longevity by any measure. Then I charged the battery the next day and at full charge it showed some 27,000 mwh capacity, or nearly 50% drop in a day. If you peak at my battery report (attached) you'll see that it has stayed in the 27k mwh range for the past 3 days, when I've been using it, charging it, calibrating, etc.

    The computer has led a charmed life, rarely traveled except by car in a case in a briefcase, never exposed to heat extremes, etc. Everything else is working fine although my stock Toshiba 256GB SSD has dropped to 4k read speed of 16 mb/s and write of around 50. Sequential read is still 500+ and Sequential write is about 135, but this was always a pretty slow SSD. I don't recall what the write speeds used to be, but they were in line with reviews on NBC, etc.

    Anyway, the battery is the thing that's got me puzzled. I'd like to return this to service as my #2 daily driver but it now only gets 3-4 hrs, not because it's draining fast, just because the capacity is shot.

    Normal for an old battery to just have the bottom drop out like this? I checked into replacement and there are mostly Chinese knockoffs, but some with at least decent reps for not fouling up machines. I read some caveats a few pages back.

    Thanks for any thoughts. i wouldn't have made this so long, but I figured others have or will have similar problems and this is too good a notebook to trash just because of the battery, especially since W 10 makes the UHD screen such a joy.

    Best, Jeff
     

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  3. John Ratsey

    John Ratsey Moderately inquisitive Super Moderator

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    That loss of capacity while left plugged in is unusual. Might there have been some very high temperatures (not good for these batteries)?

    I would re-run the calibration and see if that improves the situation. If not, then over 3 years is not a bad life for one of these batteries (11 years ago I had a Samsung notebook for which the battery lost most of its capacity just after the end of the one year warranty and the replacement was horribly expensive). There seem to be better and worse 3rd party batteries but if you can find a supplier with good feedback then it's likely to be OK.

    John
     
  4. lovelaptops

    lovelaptops MY FRIENDS CALL ME JEFF!

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    Thanks John. No, this was not exposed to heat - was in an ofc bldg w/24/7 ac. Dont know if you had a moment to scroll to bottom of the windows powercfg battery report, but it's the sudden and sustained capacity drop from 100% for 3.5 yrs (of light use) to 83% in one day to 50% on the next day and no change from the 50% level for 4 straight days, through two bios-based battery recalibrations. Even went from W10 Anniversary to Creators Update on day 3 after the "plummet" and it had virtually no effect on capacity - ie, stayed at 50%. Most of this computer's life it ran plugged-in but I intentionally ran it on battery 1-2x/wk in service of its health. Note: this battery has only had 141 power cycles.

    Question: is there a right way/wrong way to do the Samsung calibration? Eg, best to start w/full chg, 50 % chg? Best power setting to have on during the calibration drain routine, during the chrge-up routine?

    My gut says this is not purely a battery issue. Besides the abrupt, 2-stage capacity drop, the rate of drain/power draw is exactly as it always was, just starts w/50% less capacity. Whenever I've had an old L-ion laptop battery die off, once it getz into the 80-75% cap level its rate of drainage becomes greatly accelerated.





    Sent from my LG-H820 using Tapatalk
     
  5. John Ratsey

    John Ratsey Moderately inquisitive Super Moderator

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    My recommended method for the battery calibration is (i) disable any battery saver option (check Samsung Settings); (ii) charge the battery until it stops charging; (iii) fully discharge the battery including final discharge at the BIOS screen because windows will hibernate / shut down before the battery is empty; (iv) fully charge the battery. Having the computer running for this step might reduce the charge rate, which is better for the battery. I think it's the last step starting with the empty battery which is used to re-write the battery calibration info.

    John
     
  6. lovelaptops

    lovelaptops MY FRIENDS CALL ME JEFF!

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    John,

    Thanks as ever for your thoughtful and detailed support and responses. As it happened, the replacement battery I'd ordered from
    arrived today, before I had gotten to re-running calibrate and recharge as you recommended, but I'm delighted to say that the knock-off replacement made in China has 0.03% wear (or 99.70%, depending on what methodology is used to report capacity) and it cost all of $60, shipped, to get it in less than a week. I highly recommend considering http://www.battery-shop.org/ based on my singular, only 24 hours of result experience! As you recommended, I chose this source of OEM replacement batteries because it had very positive overall reviews as a supplier and the efficient, business-like and prompt manner in which they have performed so far appears to bear the ratings history out.

    Now I have this wonderful ultrabook back in full service and, though I miss the adaptive display, for $60 I have what feels like a current-day ultrabook (comparable to the hp x360 13) with a very nice 3k screen with decent color gamut (post patches to fix "mustard" yellows years ago), pretty decent battery life (back to 5-9 hrs with full capacity and several very effective power-sipping technologies courtesy of Windows 10, this machine's latest BIOS and some Windows power plan tweaks I have learned over the years. Final user rehab/refurb step: replace OEM 256GB SSD with decent current day m.2 512 (alas, no lanes for PCIE available. Have any recommendations for the replacement SSD?

    Hope all is well with you, John. I can honestly say that your continued moderation of Samsung threads was a major consideration in rehab-ing this one rather than replacing it and spending $800 - $1,200 more than the $300 max after replacing the SSD. Thank you!
     
  7. TANWare

    TANWare Just This Side of Senile, I think. Super Moderator

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    Hi, the original batteries tend over time to get failed cells. While to most it looks like a 1p/8s battery usually they are many parallel cells of smaller capacity. The advantage of the newer cells is exactly that, they are not just old new stock.
     
  8. John Ratsey

    John Ratsey Moderately inquisitive Super Moderator

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    Good to hear that you've now got a properly performing battery.

    I wouldn't lose sleep about not being able to have a PCIe SSD. My Dell Precision 5510 came with a 256GB PCIe SSD which I quickly swapped for a 1TB SATA SSD as I needed the capacity and have never noticed the performance difference although there must be situations where the extra speed gives benefits. There is the cost that more speed means more heat so the PCIe SSDs are quick to throttle to nearer SATA speeds unless given good cooling (many newer notebooks have tried to keep the SSDs cool by giving them heatsinks and locating them away from the hot ports of the computer).

    I don't have specific recommendations. The Sandisk X400 I've been using for nearly 18 months is running nicely. Samsung EVO (don't pay extra for Pro) is proven technology, Crucial/ Micron is a proven brand and I have seen WD SSDs at attractive pricing.

    The cell configuration can be deduced from the voltage: around 7.4V is 2 cells in series, around 11.1V indicates 3 cells in series. Capacities of 50 to 70Whr usually indicate 6 cells (the number of cells is often given in the battery description) and 6 cells can be configured as two parallel sets of 3 cells in series or three parallel sets of 2 cells in series. Notebooks can sometimes support different battery configurations. My NP900X3B was shipped with an 11.4V battery which was replaced under warranty (it seems there had been a bad batch of batteries) with a 7,5V battery. However, the 11.4V was only 40Whr. I don't know if it used 3 big cells or 6 small ones.

    John
     
  9. TANWare

    TANWare Just This Side of Senile, I think. Super Moderator

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    I actually refer to internally, they are more than one cell in parallel. As an example I have a nexus 10 that dies specifically at 33%, the cells fold up. Just the nature of the game is all.
     
  10. major65

    major65 Newbie

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    Hi to everybody, just got in my hands an ATIV book 9 plus np940x3g with win 10 and i cant install yellow color patch due to security reasons.
     
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