2 TB ssds

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by ole!!!, Nov 26, 2019.

  1. Vasudev

    Vasudev Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    I think most OS disregard any type of storage encryption and defaults to Software encryption say BDE or veracrypt.
    The difference in almost NIL for a properly cooled NVMe and SATA drives, I found NVMe is hotter than SATA by 2-4C and under use had the same heat 70C with NVMe outperforming SATA by a small margin.

    @tilleroftheearth Are you aware of the issue on Samsung Client based SSD especially 850 EVO m.2 which performs like garbage SSD when whole drive is partitioned as ext4 or any others?
    I couldn't find a solution, so I tried allocating 10GB and formatted to NTFS and ran Optimize and SSD performance was as advertised in both Linux and Windows. What I couldn't believe that fstrim job was working but Samsung FW was rejecting or faking it and causing performance degradation.
     
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  2. tilleroftheearth

    tilleroftheearth Wisdom listens quietly...

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    @Vasudev, interesting point about Ext4. But I don't use that at all. ;)

    NVMe drives run hotter because they can hit peak performance very, very quickly. The 'small margins' they outperform a 2.5" SATA SSD is small comfort in a notebook where cooling is very limited.

    That is why the Intel 660p and hopefully the 665p along with the new champ the Adata XPG SX8200 Pro (2TB and above need only apply...) are such a breath of fresh air in the mobile space.

    Not that they are totally impervious to throttling when pushed for very long periods of time, of course, but they are much better than anything else I've tried on my mobile platforms.
     
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  3. Hopper82

    Hopper82 Notebook Geek

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    Just installed a Sabrent 2TB bought on black friday, nice drive:
    [​IMG]

    Very similar to my other 2TB drive with Phison E12 controller (Silicon Power)..

    On Amazon there's always someone pointing out some problems but normally statistic (when high numbers are available) help in making a choice.. Anyway I can say that my Sabrent runs really cooler than my 970Evo in the same system, something like 27°c vs 45°c in idle, same heatsink, and the more ironic thing is that is also faster in magician benchmark (380/350 kiops read/write vs 350/300Kiops of the samsung). If I could go back I will buy only this kind of 'cheap' SSD over the samsung one (and it's near 2 pieces for the price of 1 for the 2Tb size).
     
    Last edited: Nov 30, 2019
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  4. Starlight5

    Starlight5 W I N T E R B O R N

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    Valid point.
    That's very helpul, thank you. What heatsink do you use, how well does it fit inside your Precision?
     
  5. Hopper82

    Hopper82 Notebook Geek

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    The heatsinks are the originals one provided from Dell, just some tiny copper plates (nothing really performing, unfortunately).
     
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  6. rlk

    rlk Notebook Evangelist

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    The 660p has poor random I/O performanc, especially in terms of latency (https://www.storagereview.com/node/7068). I've also read, but can't find the reference right now, that write throughput slows drastically (to below HDD levels) if you write more than 100GB or so without giving the drive time to move data out of the pseudo-SLC cache. Now, all of this won't matter to everyone, but it is something to be aware of (along with the much lower write endurance) if you're doing heavier data transfer.

    I don't know what "NVMe drives run hotter because they can hit peak performance very, very quickly" means. Might the 660p dissipate less power because it runs slower? Sure, but to transfer the same amount of data also means that it has to transfer data for a longer period of time.
     
  7. tilleroftheearth

    tilleroftheearth Wisdom listens quietly...

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    @rlk, yeah, the 660p has slower specs, but only in comparison to the fastest SSD's out there that can use 2x more power for less than 2x more performance. No one is recommending to buy these drives for a workstation... but for an everyday 'digital notebook', they hit a very nice sweet spot. When they were originally introduced, they were the efficiency kings. However, Adata has easily surpassed them in both performance and efficiency, but not quite caught up to them in price... yet.

    Also, don't forget that I don't consider the smaller capacities at all for any SSD I buy. 2TB (with 1TB the bare, bare minimum until 2019 is done) is where all the magic happens since SSD's were born. For performance, responsiveness, and efficiency.

    When you're talking real-world performance, even the 660p topped the Samsung 960 EVO and the 970 EVO Plus (both 1TB or larger) in my real-world testing (on my less heavy workloads, of course) - and that is ignoring the battery run time improvements on the mobile platforms I tested at the time too. The XPG-SX8200 Pro @ 2TB capacity is just better, but slightly more expensive (and easily worth it for me).

    But I don't buy these drives for their maximum (or synthetic) performance... rather, I buy these because, in their own ways, they give Optane-like responsiveness for pennies per GB on my less demanding platforms. ;)


    See:
    https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/intel-ssd-660p-qlc-nvme,5719.html

    See:
    https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/adata-xpg-sx8200-pro-ssd,5955.html

     
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  8. N2ishun

    N2ishun Notebook Enthusiast

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    I'd be real careful about anything Toms says.
    They have been caught with their hands in the cookie jar more than once (taking bribes for good review outcomes).
    Back about 1997-98 they were not a bad site.....but it's been a exponential dive from there.

    Try this instead...not a biased review.
    https://www.storagereview.com/intel_ssd_660p_series_review
    You'll find out it's a cheapo ssd barely able to outdo a spinner.
     
  9. tilleroftheearth

    tilleroftheearth Wisdom listens quietly...

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    I'd be really careful about believing a site that is testing a consumer SSD with enterprise-level workloads and invariably finds it lacking vs. the enterprise-level drives they compared it to. :)

    Testing against appropriate real workloads/workflows trumps anything synthetic testing can reveal.

    I am not showing Tom's results as anything other than it matches my own experience/testing with these drives. ;)

    YMMV.

     
  10. rlk

    rlk Notebook Evangelist

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    I have to confess that I look with a somewhat jaundiced eye on reviews that emphasize the aesthetics, particularly something like an M.2.
     
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