14" Samsung Series 7 NP700Z3C

Discussion in 'Samsung' started by SoundsGood, Aug 31, 2012.

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  1. newcastlefc200

    newcastlefc200 Notebook Consultant

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    The SSD is going to be 256GB but the hard drive I'm cloning is 1TB is there a way to clone the 1TB onto the 256GB??
     
  2. John Ratsey

    John Ratsey Moderately inquisitive Super Moderator

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    Acronis TrueImage can handle that problem provided the content on the 1TB is less than the capacity of the SSD. Maybe other cloning programs can do the same but I haven't used them.

    John
     
  3. newcastlefc200

    newcastlefc200 Notebook Consultant

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    ah OK I may look into that then.

    I guess it won't be too much bother just doing a clean install? maybe you can answer a question I have about Windows 8, If I install Windows 8 on my hard drive at present, and I can't get the clone to work, will I still be able to install it on my new SSD??
     
  4. John Ratsey

    John Ratsey Moderately inquisitive Super Moderator

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    I would refrain from doing the activation of Windows 8 until after the cloning and you have tried the SSD. Once it is activated then the system probably won't allow another automatic activation soon after (but you can probably do the more tedious manual telephone activation).

    John
     
  5. thinkpad.techuser

    thinkpad.techuser Notebook Enthusiast

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    Matte glass? Aren't laptop screens coated with special matte coating, what's this matte glass you speak of?
     
  6. John Ratsey

    John Ratsey Moderately inquisitive Super Moderator

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    I also think it is a coating to give a non-reflective surface. The coating also gives some diffusion which is why the colours of matte screen are not as rich as for glossy ones.

    John
     
  7. Dannemand

    Dannemand Decidedly Moderate Super Moderator

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    I'm sure you you're right. I wasn't speaking to how the matte effect was produced, merely to the fact that the screen is matte. But of course it's not the LCD itself, but the glass (or coating) that's matte.

    I will add that it's not just a visual difference, you can feel it too if you touch the screen.
     
  8. gadgetrants

    gadgetrants Notebook Deity

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    Floating somewhere around this forum is a how-to (or a link to an external how-to) for removing the matte coating. It's CREEPY -- you have to remove the panel, soak it in some kind of solution (I forget -- maybe soap and water?) and then GENTLY peel the coating layer off. I don't recall the particular machine (was it a Sony? Asus? Dell?), but when the operation was done, the coating reminded me of a snake skin -- A LOT thicker and "cloudier" than I imagined. Pretty much a "glued-on" version of the privacy screens you used to see.

    In the end, kind of dumb: make a beautiful, crystal-clear glass screen, and then cover it with snake skin (I have nothing against snakes, btw). And yet, most people value the matte version over the gloss/shiny/reflective/au naturale version! If we can put men on the moon I'm sure we can find a better way to engineer LCD displays.

    EDIT: OK found the post I was thinking of: [Guide] How to remove the anti-glare(AG) coating from a Dell U2312HM LCD - [H]ard|Forum Turns out it's a desktop panel, not a laptop display. Still gives me goose bumps.

    U422Ml.jpg fYs7gl.jpg T3OJbl.jpg

    -Matt
     
  9. Dannemand

    Dannemand Decidedly Moderate Super Moderator

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    @Matt: Wow, never occurred to me. Several people have been looking for replacement panels with higher contrast. Many of those might find a cheaper solution just by getting rid of the matte coating on the screen.

    Personally, I much prefer a matte screen to the glossy ones, it was one of my criteria when looking for a new laptop. Of course I'd like better contrast, but not at the price of those reflections. I can use this Sammy in sunlight, not so with my old (but otherwise great) HP HDX 18.
     
  10. gadgetrants

    gadgetrants Notebook Deity

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    If my memory serves me correctly, the Sony S15 has a glass screen with an anti-glare coating -- or maybe it's the Asus N56 (EDIT: actually, it's the S13: "a glossy, anti-reflective finish for intense color without the glare..." WTH?). Anyway, I envisioned that in the case of that machine it was sprayed on, which would mean (1) it's not a plastic-like film, and (2) you probably can't remove it. I'm sorry the story I told above implied they're all the same -- I would bet the shiny "glare" screen can be skinned in more than one way.

    -Matt
     
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