03 Infiniti G35

Discussion in 'Motorized Vehicles' started by spradhan01, Jan 31, 2012.

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  1. SemiExpert

    SemiExpert Notebook Consultant

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    Yes, and the sydeshow/drift car scene is definitely not a mainstream phenomenon. It's not even about improving performance and handling, since the whole point is doing donuts and burnouts. The ideal drift car is something that's extremely nose heavy with tiny, narrow, bald rear tires.

    Engine swaps are not easy, especially if you do it right and make it emissions legal. For a modern car, it costs five figure to fabricate a custom wiring harness. Not cheap, definitely not DIY. Even for Nissan engines, I don't think there are very many plug-and-play engine swaps. Once you get into fabricating engine mounts and cutting the firewall, you've got some major work ahead of you, even on a pre-emissions era car. And of course, most successful engine swap projects start out with engines that at least use the same transmission bell housing.

    So, if you've got the money and skills, show off your engine swap. Go ahead, what engine are you running in your $2,300 car?


    Okay, you're using a lot of JDM body codes. I get it, you're a big 240SX/Silva fan. I get it. There are probably Isuzu Impulse fans out there too. Probably Renault LeCar fans and a whole club of Studebaker aficionados. Car fans can get very specific about their likes and dislikes.

    The thing is, the 240SX wasn't all that popular or common before it left production, and it wasn't the sort of car that people save a summer car. There aren't many surviviors for everyday commuter cars from 15-23 years ago. People drive them into the ground, they get wrecked, junked, etc.


    Again, Silvia was the model name in Japan. As I recollect, there was an another generation, the S15, that only sold in Japan and a couple of Asian-Pacific RHD markets. Basically, the S14 had been a sales disaster in North America and Europe and there wasn't even a point in exporting the S15.

    Probably a few greymarket exports, but there again, I'm not sure what the point was. Lots of modern cars were quicker, better handling.

    The Silvia/240SX underscores just how dated and out of touch Nissan's niche products had become before Carlos Ghosen saved the company.

    Ah, buying cars on Craigslist. Not exactly Hemmings, is it?
     
  2. s2odin

    s2odin Merrica!

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    Wrong, wrong, and wrong.

    The VQ35 are some of the strongest engines out there. There are sedans with over 200k miles with only standard maintenance. There are also coupes with over 200k with standard maintenance.

    And only like 3% of sedans are stick. And just because it's a stick doesn't mean it would be worn out. The only issue any manual G series have had is the 06-07 coupes which had an oil consumption problem that was covered by a TSB.
     
  3. SemiExpert

    SemiExpert Notebook Consultant

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    Don't count on 200K from any gasoline engine car. Actually, count on an automatic transmission rebuild.

    By the low 100K range, you've got the best usage of any car. Then you start racking up expenses. When I've owned a car since new, I don't just get rid of it at a certain mileage, but by the mid 100K range, there's always a point when it makes sense to get a new ride. Personally, I always pay for one service item too many just before the end of my ownership.

    So, if anyone is looking at a 2003 Infinity G35 with 116K miles, my advice is to keep looking. It was nice car when it was new, but that nearly 10 years ago, and nothing lasts forever. When a car is that old with that much mileage, it's seen the majority of its useful life. Don't count on luck when it comes to really old, high mileage used cars.
     
  4. s2odin

    s2odin Merrica!

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    Highest mileage G35 on here? - Page 31 - G35Driver

    They all beg to differ.
    Just saying.
    Scroll through the earlier pages to see other stories.

    And coupes - how many miles do you guys have on your coupes? - Page 9 - G35Driver
    Enjoy
     
  5. Tsunade_Hime

    Tsunade_Hime such bacon. wow

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    Actually, you'd be surprised at all the aftermarket support. My friend was the first one in MD who did an LS1 swap 2 years ago into his S14. There were TONS of aftermarket swap parts, engine mounts, predone wiring harnesses for 400-500, custom oil pan, sway bar (he used Sikky kit). Yes he had to hammer out the transmission tunnel and the whole swap took 2 weeks and realistically 1 month to get most of the issues hammered out. There's also predone stuff for VK/VH motors.

    I'm going to rebuild my motor and do a turbo setup and when that goes out then a VH45DE swap it back into the picture. And yes there are predone stuff for the VH45DE + Z32 transmission + engine mounts + custom exhaust headers.
     
  6. Kaelang

    Kaelang Requires more Witcher.

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    I get SemiExpert's opinion. But I think he has different goals for his used cars. Like he said, he wants creampuffs. I think a lot of enthusiasts, regardless of what they like, will go for something exciting, even if it's less than creampuffy. Modern cars can go for much longer and still be tight as a drum. They don't have the same issues that 90's cars and below would have - their on-board computers do a lot of the work, and keep the car tuned as best it can.

    That's not to say that if you have a specific car or brand in mind, you shouldn't look for the one in the best condition... but a newer car with 100k miles doesn't mean as much as it used to. Even if a car runs off of gas instead of being a diesel, that doesn't mean it isn't still built to last and take a beating. There are perfect examples of that as far back as the 80's and 90's with many Japanese vehicles that have hundreds of thousands of miles on them. My 93 Camry had frankly the worst owner in the world before me, but it still kept purring, even with 130K+ miles on it. The only thing that ever happened with it was the distributor shorted out and killed the car right outside my house, but no problems since then. Now my sister's boyfriend owns it and it's still running fine.
     
  7. booboo12

    booboo12 Notebook Prophet

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    My SHO just crossed the 220,000 mile mark. Runs great and, so far, it's been rock solid reliable.
     
  8. SemiExpert

    SemiExpert Notebook Consultant

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    Well, that's another swap that I just dont get. I mean seriously, there were lots of LS1 F-bodies, a few GTOs and first generation CTS-Vs, so it's not as if anyone has to transplant an LS1 into a Nissan?

    Yes, but what about emissions testing? OBD II has been the law of the land going on 15 years.

    Aftermarket turbos are far more difficult that superchargers. Moreover, it's pretty much impossible to dial in a useful amount of boost without major engineering changes. There's a reason why most most turbo variants of normally aspirated engines have lower compression ratios and more heavily constructed pistons, rods and crankshafts.

    Now as far as the VH45, there was no variant that put out all that much power, and it was a big, heavy engine. Much bigger than the Ford modular V8. Nissan is getting a decent output out of the direct injection version of the VK56, but that's an altogether different beast. Again, if I want to play with a VH or VK, I'd advise a used Infiniti sedan, and considering its a luxury sedan, there probably are some clean ones out there.

    Thanks to Yamaha, which built and engineered the SHO engines, albeit from Ford components.

    All I'm saying that it's easier to buy a used car that isn't beaten to death to begin with. Any older used car is a risky proposition, but it helps the odds if you look for the creampuffs rather than the beaters.

    Well, I can agree that in the 80s and 90s, compact Japanese cars were outright superior in durability to small Domestics. Yes, I still see early 90s Camrys, mostly because they didn't rust as badly as previous Camrys. However, I'm hardpressed to think of the last time I saw an early 90s Ford Tempo. Most were gone even a decade ago. Actually, it was scary how fast some mainstream domestic cars disappeared from the roads.

    Having said that, I don't advise people to go out an buy 20 year old Camrys, especially ones that have been driven hard.
     
  9. spradhan01

    spradhan01 Notebook Virtuoso

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    Back to the topic, my insurance paid me less than they told me so I was running low on cash. So, I told this guy that I am short and offered him 6.5K last price.
    So, he agreed on it and this car is also on a payoff.
    He told me that I need to pay him 4k and 2.5k to the bank in installments?
    Is there any catch?
    Anyone got unlimited carfax or remaining car fax?:D
     
  10. booboo12

    booboo12 Notebook Prophet

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    True :) But other components beyond the powertrain are solid as well. Granted the car wasn't beat on by it's prior original owner, a little old lady, actually quite cool that she drove one, a stick at that. :D
     
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