Quantcast Free-Fall Sensor

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  1. #1
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    Default Free-Fall Sensor

    i ordered a m1530 with the 200gb 7200rpm hdd

    it says it comes with a free-fall sensor

    can anyone explain what this does? thanks

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Free-Fall Sensor

    if i understand it correctly, its supposed to lock the hard drive when the laptop accelerates to a certain speed; this is to prevent data loss (if you were to drop it)

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Free-Fall Sensor

    The reader/writer head of the hard drive automatically ''parks'' at its original position to stop it form scratching the disc.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Free-Fall Sensor

    interesting.
    thanks for the info

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Free-Fall Sensor

    I have this drive. Mine is a Seagate. You can check out the description of the free fall sensor on Seagate's website. By the way, the 200 GB 7200 rpm Seagate is a nice drive. Pretty quiet.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Free-Fall Sensor

    Good thread I've been meaning to ask this as well since Dell mistakenly gave me a 160GB FFS 7200RPM drive instead of what I ordered (160GB 5200RPM).
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  7. #7
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    Default Re: Free-Fall Sensor

    The Seagate HD (they claim) can detect if you are dropping you computer, and it will move the read/write heads away from the platter. See http://www.reghardware.co.uk/2007/03...mentus_7200-2/.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Free-Fall Sensor

    I suspect the danger is that if you are using the computer on a train or something it might repeatedly mistake the swaying of the carriage for drops and keep interrupting the disk access by lifting the heads off the disk. Anyway, I probably would have gone for this shock protection if I could... but I guess it is only effective for a computer that is dropped while it is on. The heads are probably parked anyway for a computer that is in standby or off... so the benefit may not be as great as it might first sound.
    Bit of a Dell fan

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Free-Fall Sensor

    I would think it would need slightly more acceleration than just the side to side swaying of a train.

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  10. #10
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    Default Re: Free-Fall Sensor

    Quote Originally Posted by Johnny T View Post
    The reader/writer head of the hard drive automatically ''parks'' at its original position to stop it form scratching the disc.
    But it do this work randomly

    I've Seagate Momentus 120GB SATAII 7200RPM 8MB (ST9120823AS)
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